My Passion's Pen

Helping to polish what your passion pens.

Archive for the tag “literature”

Submission window open for Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction

Submissions are open from April 1 to May 31, 2019.

Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction

“More than seventy short-story collections have appeared in the Flannery O’Connor Award series, which was established to encourage gifted emerging writers by bringing their work to a national readership. The first prize-winning book was published in 1983; the award has since become an important proving ground for writers and a showcase for the talent and promise that have brought about a resurgence in the short story as a genre.

Winners are selected through an annual competition that attracts as many as three hundred manuscripts. Submissions are open from April 1 to May 31 each year. Winners of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction include such widely read authors as Ha Jin, Antonya Nelson, Rita Ciresi, and Mary Hood.”

Roxane Gay is the series editor.

Submissions are open from April 1 to May 31, 2019.

https://ugapress.org/series/flannery-oconnor-award-for-short-fiction/

More on Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn

I started this book having absolutely no idea what it was about. One of my co-workers had read Gone Girl and thought I should give Flynn a try.  I should have checked out her website to give myself a bit of a buffer before I downloaded the book. http://gillian-flynn.com/sharp-objects/

I’m about halfway through and have every urge to drop out of life for half a day and barrel through the rest of this book.  I must know how things are resolved…IF they are resolved.

Camille has revealed more of herself, her demons, her self-image, her woes. As I read I wondered why she wrote on herself with pens and markers. Why was the act so significant? She’s a cutter. I never had any personal experience with this, so reading Camille’s thoughts of how she feels around others (particularly her mother and half-sister) burn through me just as words brand themselves invisibly on her flesh.

It’s hard to admit to liking a book about little girls who were brutalized and murdered and whose savior could have easily been in their same shoes, but I do not want to put this down. I yelled at my husband last night when he asked me a question while I tried to squeeze in a chapter before we went to our son’s curriculum night. The storytelling is so gripping with little nuances of the characters that speak so loudly, yet in a whisper. “…her face so perfect and character-free she could have just popped out of the womb. They all seemed unfinished.” That’s one of my favorite lines, so far.

I think Adora, Camille’s mother, is the perp, although that was made rather clear early on (unless my sleuthing skills are way off). Like I said in my earlier review, the mystery isn’t of whodunit, but why. These folks in Wind Gap have deep closets, and they’re filled with skeletons.

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