My Passion's Pen

Helping to polish what your passion pens.

Archive for the tag “editing”

Commas with Subordinate Clauses—A Reader’s Question

What are the rules for dependent clauses and commas when the dependent clause comes before, in the middle of, or after the independent clause.

via Commas with Subordinate Clauses—A Reader’s Question.

The Seven Deadly Sins of Prologues

I had started writing a ranty-ragey post about my frustration with prologues in the romance books I’ve recently read; however, in my search for supporting evidence for why prologues are bad, I came across this post. Kristen, as per usual, explains this topic with tact and clarity.

Bookmark this. Print it. Post it wherever you write. This is valuable information.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

To prologue or not to prologue? That is the question. The problem with the prologue is it has kind of gotten a bad rap over the years, especially with agents. They generally hate them. Why? In my opinion, it is because far too many writers don’t use prologues properly and that, in itself, has created its own problem. Because of the steady misuse of prologues, most readers skip them. Thus, the question of whether or not the prologue is even considered the beginning of your novel can become a gray area if the reader just thumbs pages until she sees Chapter One.

So without further ado…

The 7 Deadly Sins of Prologues

Sin #1 If your prologue is really just a vehicle for massive information dump…

In my critique group, one of the first tasks each member must do is they must write detailed backgrounds of all characters. I make…

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What Killed it For Me #5: Weak Writing

This entire series on Writers Helping Writers about what killed a book for Becca  is a rich education for writers (and critiquers). Writers can’t please every reader, and shouldn’t necessarily try, but we should always aim to provide the best, most memorable work we can. There will be plenty of readers out there who dig your style.

Speaking of style. This goes back to the basics: know the rules in order to break them. This post about weak writing first suggests that it’s subjective… Maybe, maybe not (goes back to learning the rules before breaking them). What I wholeheartedly agree with is that correcting weak writing is NOT an easy fix.

Weak and passive writing goes beyond the green squiggle in your doc that suggests you remove “was, am, being,” etc. In my experience, correcting weak writing requires rewrites. Whole sentences and paragraphs, even scenes need to be remastered to eliminate the offense. Sometimes it’s the author’s excessive use of their “go-to” words or phrases. Other times, overusing adverbs and adjectives, which makes for flowery prose that really does nothing to move the story forward are to blame. Or, the author is simply too verbose, using 17 words to convey something that could be said in six.

The linked article shares a handful of easy to remember tips that will help you to eventually banish these weak writing habits that weigh your stories down. When you get some time, check out Becca’s entire series.

What Killed it For Me #5: Weak Writing.

What Killed it For Me #5: Weak Writing

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